Wednesday
Dec252013

High Tea in Asia

Leave it to the English aristocracy to turn a simple afternoon snack into a full-blown production, complete with artfully prepared petits fours (bite-sized snacks) that look so nice they actually invoke a twinge of guilt when bitten into. Just a twinge, though. I mean, honestly – you’re supposed to eat them.

Fortunately for today’s travelers, you don’t have to be a duke or a duchess to count yourself among the socialites at a high-brow afternoon tea affair. Some of the finest high tea affairs in the world are staged in five-star hotels across Asia – and particularly in former seats of the British colonial empire. To that end, let’s have a look at a few of the best places to enjoy high tea in Asia.

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Wednesday
Dec182013

New Year’s Eve Celebrations in Asia’s Big Cities

Spending New Year’s Eve in a strange city is always a bit daunting. Where do you go? What should you do? Where’s the best place to experience the holiday as the locals do? With that in mind, Agoda.com contacted some locals in Asia’s biggest cities and asked them where they’d go if they wanted a good show, some great fireworks, and big crowds of people celebrating their entry into 2014.

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Wednesday
Dec112013

City Insider: A weekend of exploring in Dubai

Dubai is many things to many people – actually, let’s be honest, it’s mainly shopping to most people – but while a recent mother-and-daughter weekend there definitely highlighted the commercial side of Dubai, we found a few other great reasons to appreciate to this glittering, booming, ever-changing city state.

First of all, it’s incredibly safe. So safe that when we decided to go for a walk at a rather ungodly hour we wandered through well-lit streets, saw plenty of guards watching over things, and never had a single moment of doubt or fear.

For family travelers, this is a real reason to return. Safe, clean and friendly - what a winning combination.

But for a first-timer to Dubai, what should be on the agenda? What is un-missable in this amazing city? Suppose you have just a weekend, as we did. What should absolutely be on the to-do list?

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Wednesday
Dec042013

Big City Transit: Hong Kong

Hong Kong has it all – from subways and buses to affordable taxis and surprisingly speedy ferries. As compact as Hong Kong is, even your two feet have serious currency. Getting around a major metropolis doesn’t get much easier than this.

First things first: go to a 7-Eleven or MTR service counter and purchase an Octopus card. In a city where so many different transport companies are running routes by land, rail and sea, this all-in-one smart card is a lifesaver. Practically every form of public transit accepts the Octopus, and you’ll save yourself from that awkward standoff with a driver who needs exact change when you don’t have it.

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Wednesday
Nov272013

City insider: Sydney Summer Fun  

For many westerners, Christmas and New Year's Eve are typically associated with snowfall, chestnuts roasting on open fires, mulled wine, and generally being cold. In Australia, it's the middle of summer – this year predicted to be one of the hottest – and the open fires are hopefully restricted to barbecues charring festive flavor into sausages and steaks (and chicken for the vegetarians).

While it might seem jarring to those from the northern hemisphere to spend this time of year trying to avoid sunburn rather than snowstorms, Yule time in the "sunburnt country" is the best time to visit. Sydney – a notoriously grumpy city in winter – comes to life in the warmer months, outdoorsy activities come to the fore and there's a summer schedule of activities that includes music festivals, the performing arts, markets, cricket, and more. Many events are staged around the jewel in the city's crown – Sydney Harbor – giving you more of an excuse to enjoy Australia's brilliant summer weather.

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Wednesday
Nov202013

Fortune Telling in Asia

Throughout Asia, fortune telling – or more properly, divination – is still widely practiced. Tarot cards, palm readers, and numerologists can be seen everywhere from rickety street corner card tables to public parks in the shade of a tree to large stalls in upscale hotel lobbies. Indeed, some of the best known diviners work out of temples, and some have lineups, with customers waiting hours and traveling great distances to see them.

For westerners, divination is something that has been somewhat watered down by popular culture over the past 100 years or so, and it’s generally taken less seriously – a fun thing you do with friends or at a carnival, although there are certainly those who place great importance on a good reading.

But for people from Japan to China to Thailand to India, divination is very much a part of daily life, and is often taken into consideration when making important decisions. Let’s have a quick look into some of the more popular methods that you might come across when traveling.

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Wednesday
Nov132013

Mongolia - Home of the Khans

Genghis Khan and Mongolia are synonymous. Few country’s name and their former leader are known by so many yet visited by so few. This is a rugged land with rugged people who share a rich history, firmly rooted in tradition yet racing towards all that the modern world has to offer. Its capital Ulaanbaatar (UB), temperature-wise, is the coldest on earth, the countryside has little arable farmland, and it’s the second largest landlocked country in the world (Kazakhstan is first), making it a challenging place to survive in, let alone prosper. Perhaps this is part of the reason why more than half of Mongolia’s three million residents have moved to the capital, making it a rapidly changing city with a kaleidoscope of people, colors and flavors.

Ulaanbaatar’s name alone is exotic and far-flung enough to warrant a visit, and once there you will understand what being at the edge of the Earth is like. Tourists rarely visit in any substantial numbers and you might find yourself as a bit of an attraction. Most famous for its fearsome leader Genghis Khan (also spelled Chingis/Chinghis Khaan) who formed one of the largest empires the world has ever seen, you can see firsthand the type of harsh, barren landscape that shaped a legendary, brutal leader. Born Temujin, likely in 1162, he conquered most of modern day China, further south to what is now Vietnam, ventured in to parts of Myanmar and west all the way to eastern Europe and the Middle East before dying in 1227 and passing power to his son. Delving in to Genghis’ history and the legend should be an integral part of a visit and it’s easy to do, as images and info are everywhere. There’s even an Irish Pub bearing his name!

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Wednesday
Nov062013

Big City Transit: Singapore

You’re never far from where you want to be in Singapore – and that’s just one more reason to love the local transit system. You can wheel around in a trishaw or board a bumboat to cruise the Singapore River and admire the skyline. For pure transit needs in this world-class city, you’ll find everything you need between the MRT, taxis and buses. And as with so many things in Singapore, you can expect that the infrastructure is going to be well-organized and spotlessly clean.

Residents and long-term visitors carry an EZ-Link stored value card, which covers both the MRT and bus networks and eliminates those awkward scrounging-for-change-in-your-pocket moments. If you’re just in the city for a few days, pick up a Singapore Tourist Pass for a few bucks per day and enjoy unlimited access to the MRT and buses. 

Read on for a breakdown of Singapore’s transit system:

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Thursday
Oct312013

Agoda.com wins Lonely Planet Traveller Award for Best Booking Service in Thailand

It’s been a good week in the Agoda.com offices. We are very honored to announce that we were named as the Best Booking Service in Thailand at the recent Lonely Planet Traveller Destination Awards 2013.

The event, which was held in Bangkok, Thailand, was presented by Lonely Planet Traveller, a branch of the award winning monthly magazine for those who are curious about the world.

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Thursday
Oct242013

The other side of Koh Phangan 

Poor Koh Phangan – all you ever really hear about are its full moon parties. This is largely the work of the island itself, which is constantly trumpeting full moon and half-moon and black moon events, and ignoring all the other great things to do there. True, the full moon party is a huge draw for the island, but it's just one tiny aspect of Phangan.

In fact, Phangan is as idyllic a destination as any other Thai island. It shares the same topography as neighboring Samui – the same powdery sand, clear turquoise water, rainforest jungles, waterfalls, mountain lookouts, coral reefs, and secluded bays and coves. On the cultural side, there are Buddhist temples, meditation and yoga retreats, art enclaves, Muay Thai camps and an international array of restaurants. It diverges from the better-known islands in that it leans more towards the bohemian, and is overall more relaxed and affordable than, say, Phuket or Samui.

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